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Thread: History of your breed

  1. #1
    Couch Potato Senior Dog Member+Senior Dog Moderator Dax's Avatar
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    History of your breed

    I would be real interested in hearing the history, myths, etc of your dog's breeds.

    This is not a contest - just a sharing of the wealth of knowledge.

    Information like the country of origin, date of the breed, etc.

  2. #2
    Senior Dog Member crazy_for_corgis's Avatar
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    the legend of the corgi:

    They were the enchanted steeds of the fai.ry's to ride. The lighter colored markings on their backs represented the saddles that the faeries used to place on their backs. I have a book with the whole myth written down, but this is all I can remember by memory. Here are some pics:
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    RIP Nikki my sweet Angel........

  3. #3
    Senior Dog Member crazy_for_corgis's Avatar
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    oh yea....their ancestory breed is the Swedish Vallhund
    RIP Nikki my sweet Angel........

  4. #4
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    Talking

    Here's Oshee's...
    http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/americanpitbull.htm

    http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/catahoula.htm

    http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/greyhound.htm

    These are the breed standards,but If you scroll down to where it says origin,you can read about their origins....

  5. #5
    Senior Dog Member Luvit73's Avatar
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    Scotland's Littlest Warrior
    the Shetland Sheepdog
    He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog.
    You are his life, his love, his leader.
    He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart.
    You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion."
    - unknown
    The Ancient Land
    Lost in the ancient mists of the Shetland Islands in Scotland, in a land of rugged, rocky coasts where storms sweep the land, lived a small, dark race of people called the Picts. The Norsemen later overran the land, and then the Scots as well.

    In this land of sparseness of vegetation and ruggedness of climate, these islands produced every living thing in diminutive size. Shetland ponies, sheep and cattle grew much smaller than their counterparts on the mainlands. The islanders' chief occupations were fishing, and raising the Shetland sheep whose long, soft wool made Shetland wool products in demand the world over.
    During the summers the herds of sheep were ferried to outlying islands and left alone
    Shetland Sheepdog.
    The shepherds selected this small dog because (in typical Scottish fashion) they
    could see no reason to feed a larger one. The dogs were the shepherd's working
    partners - sharing his life during the lonely hours, sleeping with him, caring for his
    sheep, guarding his property. This close association with humans as well as sheep
    gave this breed an uncannying understanding of people and an intense sense of
    responsibility. From such stock comes the modern breed of dog that is affectionately known as the Sheltie.
    The True Sheltie
    The Sheltie with the true "old fashioned" Sheltie character is capable of establishing a relationship with its master based on mutual respect and understanding, an equality in which both parties communicate without use of words exactly what is expected of the other. This type of Sheltie may seem to others to be "just another dog," because he "turns on" only to his special person. The relationship becomes obvious, though, when dog and man are working together. The dog is so receptive to that person, so eager, so happy, that bystanders marvel at the teamwork.

    There is a certain charm about such Shelties. They have a dignity and self-confidence which makes them occasionally disdainful, demanding, and insistent of their rights. Yet they are loving, loyal, and openly communicative.
    This truly exceptional old Sheltie character is hard to find these days. Some Shelties are bolder than others; some are more demonstrative of their affection. Some are quiet and others more active; some like to greet strangers, while others could care less about anyone except their beloved masters. Yet, inside each individual Sheltie lies the heart and soul of...
    an ancient Scottish Warrior!
    The only thing better than having a dog , is having two !

  6. #6
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    lol Luvit,that's pic is cute!

  7. #7
    Senior Dog Member Luvit73's Avatar
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    The Siberian Husky originated in Russia, where they were bred and raised by the Chukchi people for thousands of years. The Chukchi, a tribe of Siberian nomads, needed dogs that could provide fast, economical transportation over the vast frozen land. Unusually strong and agile, this medium size dog was able to swiftly cover long distances on a minimal amount of food. Known for their gentle nature, the Chukchi dog often served as a soft, furry beds for the tribal children, hence the phrase "three dog night".

    Together the Chukchi people and the Siberian Husky dog developed a special relationship born of mutual need and nurtured by mutual respect. Together, they thrived in virtual isolation for centuries in the tundra before the outside world discovered and fell in love with this magnificent dog. Although the present-day Siberian Husky has changed since entering this country in the early 1900s, the breed still maintains many of the qualities that made the Chukchi sled dog such a prized possession.

    The first known introduction of the Siberian Husky into the United States was to Alaska by a fur trader in 1909. Used for sledding, these dogs started winning Alaskan races almost immediately. The word was spreading about this superior strain of sled dog in Siberia.

    The first team of Siberian Huskies made its appearance in the All Alaska Sweepstakes Race of 1909. The same year a large number of them were imported to Alaska by Charles Fox Maule Ramsay and his team, driven by John "Iron Man" Johnson, won the grueling 400-mile race in 1910. For the next decade Siberian Huskies, particularly those bred and raced by Leonhard Seppala, captured most of the racing titles in Alaska, where the rugged terrain was ideally suited to the endurance capabilities of the breed. Leonhard Seppala became famous for his outstanding racing Siberians. One especially well-known lead dog of Seppala's was Balto.


    Balto played an instrumental roles in saving many lives in an Alaskan village (Nome). In January 1925, doctors realized that a potentially deadly diphtheria epidemic was poised to sweep through Nome's young people. The only serum that could stop the outbreak was in Anchorage, nearly a thousand miles away. But the lone aircraft that could quickly deliver the medicine had been dismantled for the winter. In desperation, officials turned to a much lower-tech solution: moving the medicine by sled dog.

    Soon, a musher embarked from Anchorage on the first leg of a remarkable dog-sled relay aimed at delivering the needed serum to Nome. More than 20 mushers took part, battling temperatures that rarely rose above 40 degrees below zero Fahrenheit and winds that sometimes blew strong enough to knock over sleds and dogs. Reporters brought news of the race to a world suddenly transfixed by the drama in the far north.

    Incredibly, just six days later, on February 2, 1925, Gunner Kaassen drove his heroic dog team into the streets of Nome. In the lead of his team was a husky named Balto, whose furry face soon became known around the world. A year later, in honor of the epic trek, admirers erected a statue of Balto in New York City's Central Park. The statue says:


    Dedicated to the indomitable spirit of the sled dogs that relayed antitoxin six hundred miles over rough ice across treacherous waters through arctic blizzards from Nenana to the relief of stricken Nome in the Winter of 1925. Endurance, Fidelity, Intelligence

    Balto was suddenly a world-famous celebrity; for two years after the serum run, the dog and some of his teammates traversed the continental United States as part of a traveling show. After Balto died in 1933, his body was preserved and displayed at Cleveland's Natural History Museum. In 1995, a popular animated movie about Balto was released, adding to his fame.

    Many of today's Siberian Huskies have pedigrees tracing back to Seppala's great racing dogs, including Siberians used primarily for showing and Siberians used primarily for working.



    The only thing better than having a dog , is having two !

  8. #8
    Senior Dog Member crazy_for_corgis's Avatar
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    Balto was suddenly a world-famous celebrity; for two years after the serum run, the dog and some of his teammates traversed the continental United States as part of a traveling show. After Balto died in 1933, his body was preserved and displayed at Cleveland's Natural History Museum. In 1995, a popular animated movie about Balto was released, adding to his fame.
    yay balto! I love that story. The movie's pretty good too.
    RIP Nikki my sweet Angel........

  9. #9
    Count the Cotons Senior Dog Moderator Moo's Avatar
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    Possibly travelling with French troops, Cotons de Tulear are the official royal dog of Madagascar. The Coton is related to the French B'ichons and Poodles and the Italian Bolognese. Due to it's unique coat, its name literally means "Cotton of Tulear", Tulear being an African city (south Madagascar). They have a muscular upper body making them extremely small for their size and appearance. Having lived in the jungles of Madagascar for many years, Cotons are often content on a vegetarian diet.
    ♫ Come and knock on our door.... ♪

  10. #10
    TG I'm a country girl Senior Dog Member+ doglovin's Avatar
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    ok,i'll come back when i collect some info!
    My Rotti's: Chanae&Dunamis
    "My black and Tan Heartthrobs"
    R.I.P. King&Annie

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