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Thread: Expalin to me Cow Hocked

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    Senior Dog Member+ fairlight's Avatar
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    Expalin to me Cow Hocked

    If I am understanding this correctly when a pup is put into a stacking position the hocks will stick out farther than the top of the leg??? I was shown to lift the pups leg straight up to meet the top of it's leg. If it doesn't form a straight line then the pup is hocked. Is this correct? Please tell me or show me some examples in what to look for in a pup to make sure the dog is not hocked. Also. If the pup is 8 weeks and old and shows no sign of hocking does that mean there is a good to excellent chance that the pup in later months will not become hocked.
    Does this pertain to front legs too?
    Love knows not its own depth until the hour of separation.

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  2. #2
    Hocks are on the BACK legs only and as far as bone structure are the canine equivalent of our heels. Being cow-hocked means the dog or puppy, when standing naturally with the rear pasterns perpendicular to the ground, has hocks that tilt toward each other and cause the rear feet to toe out. A slightly cow-hocked PUPPY of some breeds will occasionally grow into it, loads of GSD puppies for example are cow-hocked while they're going through their gangly phase because of their extreme over angulation. A puppy that isn't cow-hocked at 8 weeks probably isn't going to be as a mature adult. Here's an example of cow hocks (in an Akita):



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    Couch Potato City Senior Dog Member+ BorzoiMom's Avatar
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    Sevensins posted an excellent example. The other problem with being a cowhocked puppy, is that it can also be an indicator that later in life, the pup could develop slipped or laxing patellas. This could be mild to severe- severe needing surgery to correct by surgically deeping the patella so that the " muscles" stay in the grove and do not slip out causing pain and lameness. Just like us- one part of structure can affect another part. In this case if you can imagine the hock rocking in, can put stress on the patella ( or 'knee")...
    My dogs can turn on a dime, and give you eleven cents change.
    Michelle

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    Senior Dog Member+ fairlight's Avatar
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    Now there is a pic I can understand.....then Oso is cow hocked. I always laughed at the size of him and how those double dews in the back turn out slightly. Now if I have a small pup right in front of me how do I check for hocking? Do I check from the back like this picture is showing me? Is this done by just looking at the pup or should there be manipulation involved.
    Love knows not its own depth until the hour of separation.

    Kabil Gibran

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    water dogs rock!! Senior Dog Member+ HovawartMom's Avatar
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    I had a hova that was cow legs but she had excellent hips so it's not related.It can be improved with supplements but will never go totally away.Swimming helps,a lot but it's a major defect in show dogs and can be hereditary but can also show up in a lignthat never had it thus the lign that Titus and his 2 sisters came from!.
    You do not want to breed a dog that has it!.
    My Golden's slideshow:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3cQhJc2LDM
    My Hovawart's slideshow:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uh_1toD6xtc
    If you don't like a wet,shedding dog,don't get a Golden or an Hovawart!.

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    Senior Dog Member+ fairlight's Avatar
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    Did you know right off that she was hocked Golden?
    Love knows not its own depth until the hour of separation.

    Kabil Gibran

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    Couch Potato City Senior Dog Member+ BorzoiMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fairlight View Post
    Now there is a pic I can understand.....then Oso is cow hocked. I always laughed at the size of him and how those double dews in the back turn out slightly. Now if I have a small pup right in front of me how do I check for hocking? Do I check from the back like this picture is showing me? Is this done by just looking at the pup or should there be manipulation involved.
    Watch how the puppy moves. Even a stack can cover up a cow hocked puppy. But movement will show it. You are looking from the back of the puppy- yes.. Watch it for a while. After all- puppies can be clumsy sometimes, but a real cow hock is pretty obvious. Another way is to pick the pup up and lower to stand on a table. As the pup recovers their paws from the lift, you can see it then too. However- movement especially a trot is the most obvious.
    My dogs can turn on a dime, and give you eleven cents change.
    Michelle

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    Senior Dog Member+ fairlight's Avatar
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    Ummm BM?.....I have never seen a puppy trot....it's either a gallop or a case of the zoomies. So when I pick the pup up the back quarters would be facing me.
    Love knows not its own depth until the hour of separation.

    Kabil Gibran

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by fairlight View Post
    Now there is a pic I can understand.....then Oso is cow hocked. I always laughed at the size of him and how those double dews in the back turn out slightly. Now if I have a small pup right in front of me how do I check for hocking? Do I check from the back like this picture is showing me? Is this done by just looking at the pup or should there be manipulation involved.
    You check looking directly behind the puppy, while the puppy is standing level with its rear pasterns perpendicular to the ground on a non slippery surface (like a grooming table with ridged rubber matting, the high surface is nice also because you are more level with the puppy and faults are easier to see from the proper perspective). Here's a quick example, I know neither of these puppies I just found the photos randomly, they're the same breed from different breeders. The puppy in the first photo is not only cow-hocked but also appears to be toed out in front. The puppy in the second photo is normal.




  10. #10
    water dogs rock!! Senior Dog Member+ HovawartMom's Avatar
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    Fair,
    We knew right away cos we adopted her when she was 6 mths and so was the breeder.She was given to us.It was very visible so we x-rayed the hips .We don't have her,anymore cos she was fighting all the other females,in the house!.
    My Golden's slideshow:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3cQhJc2LDM
    My Hovawart's slideshow:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uh_1toD6xtc
    If you don't like a wet,shedding dog,don't get a Golden or an Hovawart!.

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