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Thread: dog hates husband

  1. #1
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    dog hates husband

    My 3 year old mixed breed is getting worse. He barks at my husband whenever he enters the room or the house. My dog also sometimes growls at other family members entering the room. Over time, it has been getting worse and worse. The dog trainer has suggested using a pinch collar, and training my dog to sit and stay by me whenever my husband enters the room. I've tried using a shake can to distract his attention, but whenever he's in a barking frenzy he just ignoress me. Any other suggestions?

  2. #2
    Labified Senior Dog Member+ GretaJack's Avatar
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    What kind of mix, do you know? Have you owned the dog since he was a puppy? What relationship does the dog have with your husband versus you? Who is/was the trainer, disciplinarilan? Does this dog have a dominant personality? Is he challenging your husband for alpha or is this behavior shown out of fear? How does your husband approach the dog in normal circumstances? In the agressive circumstances? Has ever attempted to bite or is he just threatening with his voice? What is yours and your husbands response to this behavior?

    If we can get a better idea of what is happening someone here might be able to gear you in the right direction.
    See Jacob grow http://katiejmcnamara.blogspot.com

    Missed Greatly, Forever Remembered. In memory of my lost ones; Moby (9/13/03), Carbon (09/13/03), Tanner (10/16/05), Aries (07/31/07) and Millie (09/25/07).

  3. #3
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    He's some kind of pug mix. I found him as a stray when he was 7 months old. I am the alpha, and the dog absolutely loves me, follows me everywhere, and never growls at me. I do his training and his feeding. He is very protective of me and always guards me. My husband will just walk in the house or walk in the room, and the dog will growl at him and sometimes attack his feet. My husband's response is to make him sit and give him a treat, but in a way, I feel this is rewarding the dog for barking at him, so I'm trying to find another way. I've tried shouting at the dog "quiet", but then I would be shouting all day. The trainer said my husband should handle the dog more, but whenever they go on a walk together, the dog is so reluctant to go and walks so slowly and unhappily. The dog has bitten my brother once (on their first meeting) and has nipped my husband once or twice.

  4. #4
    Labified Senior Dog Member+ GretaJack's Avatar
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    My first thought then is that he may have had some bad experiences with men before you found him since you said he has also had some issues with your brother. From my experiences also, smaller dogs seem more intimidated by men simply for their stature, the lower voice, bigger feet even, without justified cause.

    What would your dog do if your husband would sit or lay on the floor with him and a handful treats and just pet him and then give him treats for accepting petting? Or even just have him on a leash sitting on the floor, making him learn to accept his presence first, and then encouraging the dog to come closer and making a positive rewarding situation?

    I would also recommend that your husband spend more time with him, just as your trainer. I would have your husband be the one to feed him, give him new toys or treats (his favorite ones of course) but all interaction with the dog and husband needs to be as positive as possible. So I personally would not recommend using a pinch collar.

    Do you think any of that would work? Or have you tried that already without any results?
    See Jacob grow http://katiejmcnamara.blogspot.com

    Missed Greatly, Forever Remembered. In memory of my lost ones; Moby (9/13/03), Carbon (09/13/03), Tanner (10/16/05), Aries (07/31/07) and Millie (09/25/07).

  5. #5
    Senior Dog Member+ eXile's Avatar
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    Agreed. All accurances must be positive with your husband. Its a bit personal but did your husband hit him as younger pup? Behaviour such as that should never be accepted towards any family members in my opinion. I would think just normal correcting would work. You can ask your husband to totally ignore the barking and growling untill he calms down and then i would suggest your hubby plays a fun game with your dog. Favourite one ofcourse Like you mentioned, he loves you to death (not exact words but you get my drift lol) maybe he feels he needs to protect you from him. Why i wouldnt know. Sorry i cant be of more help.
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  6. #6
    Couch Potato Senior Dog Member+Senior Dog Moderator Dax's Avatar
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    This is what the situation sounds like to me. You & the dog have bonded and become your own little pack. The dog will put up with other members of your family but doesn’t consider them his equal. Also, it was likely cute when he was a puppy and you were (maybe unintentionally) reinforcing the behavior. It is always a danger when one member of the family is the main care giver.

    This is what I would do.

    1. At least one meal per day to be fed by different family members. They should make the dog sit or something else before giving him any meal.
    2. At least twice a week, the dog to be walked by a different family member. Enjoy the time to do something else.
    3. If the dog barks or growls at another family member, they should be put in a sin bin away from you (not them but you). The member that they growled or barked at should be the one to release them.
    4. This is optional – have your husband take dog to a 6 week obedience course. (you to stay home) to start their own bonding.

    Now #1 & #2 are not permanent measures but should be done at least for several months. #3 is permanent – it will teach the dog that he is expected to greet family members with respect or he will not be allowed to interact.

  7. #7
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    sorry, no ideas, but I think your husband must be a very patient and calm person to tolerate being barked at in his own house! I rememeber when my exbf was here that the german shepherd had bonded with him...she basically ignored me although I was the one to feed her and walk her, pay for her vet, be here with her, etc...well after he split we had to do some 'coming around'. She wasn't my first pick and I sure wasn't hers either, but I discovered that when I sorta 'pushed' for her to let me roll her around and love on her she accepted it. she'd been craving it and apparently he never gave her ANY attention like I thought he was. anyways, she never barked at me before, but it was clear she didn't prefer me and it always hurt my feelings. But I kept at it and she made a move too to accept it and now we get along great. I still have to watch her with strangers when she's leashed or near the house, but she's never bitten anyone and has turned into a wussy dog with me!

  8. #8
    Bubby Central Senior Dog Member+ AussiesCollies's Avatar
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    I agree with the others, have your husband be more involved with your dog's everyday activities such as feeding him, giving him treats, playing with him, etc. Make your husband do more with the dog and maybe both of you sit down and give the dog attention at the same time. Hopefully that'll help.
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  9. #9
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    Put the dog in a pinch collar. Give it a sharp pop if it doesn't behave. You hired a trainer for a REASON. I wouldn't hesitate to put a prong on any dog... as LONG AS THE OWNER KNOWS HOW TO USE IT. Do NOT fit it "high and behind the ears..." That is cruel, and an inappropriate fitting of the collar.
    Just above the flat buckel... and just enough slack to make it "nip" not so tight it bites.
    This should quickly get you the results that you want.... oh... and the shake can? If you can get whatever you put in out... return it for the deposit... It's not exactally a useful training tool.

  10. #10
    Protector of Dobes Senior Dog Member+ Dobified's Avatar
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    Dax gave you some very good advice. It does sound as if the dog only see you as part or it's pack an no one else and the dogs is chaing away any interlopers.

    He needs more socialization with other people, dogs, places and things. Reassurance for the dog is very important when the dog has done something good. It will take time to turn your dog around but you need to stay consistent and your dog will be a good dog soon enough.
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