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Thread: crate training a 2/3 yr old

  1. #1
    Junior Member Junior Puppy Member
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    OK, if you have read some of my other posts then you know the situation. We are going to start crating our dog, we are not sure if she was ever crated before but after some research we figured this would be a start on getting her back to a good housbreaking routine. My question is how should I go about introducing her to a crate? Normally she sits with us on the couch (on a blanket) with my wife and I and watches TV then at bed time she sleeps in a dog bed in our bedroom. During the day she is gated in the kitchen. I was thinking about putting the cage in the TV room with us and put her in there for a little while (with the same blanket) while we watch TV. My question is should we keep her in there the enitre time or just for intervals and when she is out let her up on the couch with us? At Bedtime I will just put her in the cage in our bedroom(and pray she doesn't whine) and during the day keep her in the cage in the kitchen.

    So I guess my main question is shoule I introduce her slowly to it or just put her right in?

    Thanks (for the previous help as well)

  2. #2

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    Set it out where she can see it. Do not just put her in there and leave her for hours the first time. Let her know that she will get back out eventually. Put her bed in there with her at night. As far as letting her up on the couch, that's up to you. Since you've already started letting her though, it's going to be hard to break her of it.

  3. #3
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    Definately do it slowly, but be prepared. My first dog came from the humane society. When we tried to crate him he went beserk!

    Do it slow - for small amounts of time. Even if it's only 2 minutes in the crate. Also - don't let your dog whine and bark in the crate. If she's whining - go over and tell her to be quiet. I've also found that giving the metal on the crate a shake or hit makes an irritating noise for the dog.

    Also - when you let her out, make sure she's not barking or jumping around. That just reinforces the bad behavior. She'll think that any time she barks - she'll get let out.

    Good Luck!

  4. #4
    Junior Member Junior Puppy Member
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    Im so lost why people crate train. I have never nor would I ever do it.

    I have an excellent trained male Rottweiler who is 95% (jumping on people is his only bad habit whick im working on) trained and never used a crate. I have owned other Rottweilers too and never a major issue that would justify a crate.

    I personally believe patients, love and authority while attending dog school (for socialisations and learning) you cant go wrong. He is very spoiled and loved and he sleeps in our room every night without a fuss. Oh he is only 18 months old.

    Beats me why people lock dogs in a confine box for. If my boy is naughty I tell him to 'drop' and he wont move until I say 'free'. Thats what I believe you should train your dogs to do.
    Peter<br /><a href="http://www.rottys.net" target="_blank">http://www.rottys.net</a>

  5. #5

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    Okay, I don't know what you've heard about crates, but you have an awful lot to say about them without knowing their purpose. It's not a punishment tool and it has nothing to do with manners.

  6. #6
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    #222 is wrong. Ignore the whining. Only give the dog attention when it is being quiet. If you give it attention while it is whining, then it is training you to let it out if it cries. As far as the person with the Rottweiller, they must have gotten lucky or their house has been shredded to pieces and they are ok with that. Crate training is a life saver. It becomes like there room. It keeps them safe from chewing on electrical wires and other things that might be toxic, ect. It might take days or weeks to crate train. Don't give up. Also, keep the crate in one place while training. You want that area to become like there room. I did that with my dog and after she was trained, I let someone borrow her crate and she kept returning to the same area even with her crate gone.

  7. #7
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    Something you might also try is to give the dog treats or toys in the crate
    <a href="http://lisasdoghouse.20m.com" target="_blank">http://lisasdoghouse.20m.com</a>

  8. #8
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    I don't mean to go over and baby the dog when he is whining. When our pup starts to whine - I go over tell him "no - quiet" and bang the cage. Then I walk away. This is how we taught both our dogs to behave in the crate. I don't ever give him any positive attention for the whining - but I don't want him to learn that it's ok to whine and carry on. He only gets let out when he can sit and be good.

    Crates are a definate life saver though. Our 1st pup chewed a coffee table, end table, molding and a christmas tree. If you have the time to supervise your pup all day - then there isn't a need for a crate. But every now and then we all need to leave our house - and let's face it - our dogs can be pretty destructive some times. Even if you think crating is mean - it's a lot nicer than having your dog get into something poisonous.

  9. #9
    Mom and WSS Breeder Senior Dog Member+ NicoleLJ's Avatar
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    Since this is something I have a lot of experience in I think I will put my 2 cents in. If the dog noticably freaks at the sight of the crate then take the door off and put the food bowls in teh back 0f the crate. The dog will eventually go in of it's own accord and eat and drink then leave. After several days this should be fine for the dog. Re atatch the door but leave it open for the next two days. Then the next time close the door while the dog eats. Don't look at it or act like you notice it at all while it is in there. The food should keep it busy. But don't open the door as soon as he finishes his food. He should sit or lie down open the door five minutes after this. You can then start making the times longer. After a while you ca remove the food and just put in a Kong with peanut butter or a bone. I hope this helps

  10. #10
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    Some dogs do have anxieties when it comes to crates. I used to have a pit bull/boxer mix that I adopted from a humane society. He FREAKED OUT whenever he went anywhere near a cage. After we went through two crates - we just gave up. We locked him in a room in the basment, and he was fine.

    I think his anxieties came from being at the humane society. While he was there - he completely stopped eating, and lost quite a bit of weight. Once we brought him home - he started eating and gained all his weight back.

    There are just some dogs that are unable to be crated, mostly because of bad experiences in the past.

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