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Thread: I have a question about Yeast in dog food...

  1. #1
    Senior Dog Member+ Obedog's Avatar
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    I have a question about Yeast in dog food...

    Question... What dog food ingredients contain yeast? Or does the food only contain yeast if it says yeast??? Just got back from the doggie chiro, and I showed him a sore toe nail that Mattie has, and he said she has too much yeast in her diet... (She also has a lick sore, and gets these things all the time.)
    I'm not bossy, I just have better ideas!

  2. #2
    Senior Dog Member+ alimel's Avatar
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    I don't see yeast listed as an ingredient in Innova but I believe there is yeast in the B vitamins in dog food if I am not mistaken.
    Life is short, play with your dog!

  3. #3
    water dogs rock!! Senior Dog Member+ HovawartMom's Avatar
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    This is what I found:
    Yeast Infections In Dogs


    Yeasts are single cell organisms, which are found on the surfaces of all living things, including your dog's body. Yeasts normally live on the mucous membranes of the digestive tract. One family of yeasts called, Candida albicans, live in the digestive tract and consume substances such as sugar and fats in order to survive. When our dog's immune system is healthy, the body is able to destroy the yeasts and keep them under control. However, when the immune system is weak, the yeast, being an opportunistic feeder, may produce in mass amounts causing toxins that disable the immune system and prevent it from functioning properly. At this point, the system becomes altered causing a host of health problems. So, It goes without saying that an overgrowth of yeast toxins will affect your pet's immune system, nervous system, and their endocrine system. Since these systems are all inter-connected, yeast toxins play a major role in causing allergies, bladder infections, skin disorders and many other health problems.


    Yeast infections in dogs are usually found in the skin and ears and are caused by an organism called Malasezzia pachydermatis or malasezzia for short. Malasezzia, interestingly enough, appeared on the dermatology scene about 10 years ago, but may have been around a lot longer. It used to be, and still is in many dogs, one that is ever present but doesn't do any harm. In the dogís ears, it is considered a secondary pathogen, but in the skin it is now recognized as a primary one, although there is usually a predisposing cause that changes it from an innocent bystander into an itchy, relentless problem.

    Many times,dogs that are suffering from malasezzia will have skin lesions or sores. These lesions can be only one or two or, localized in patches, or in some cases all over the body. These sores are usually red and are accompanied by areas of increased pigmentation, hair loss, and scaliness or greasiness. This scaliness and greasiness with a yellowish tint is usually indicative that malasezzia is the culprit. The dogs are also usually very itchy and have a musty type odor. The most common sites for these sores are the underside of the neck, the belly, and the feet, especially between the toes.

    Candida albicans is another yeast-like fungus that normally lives in a healthy balance in the body. When the balance is upset, infection results. This is known as Candidiasis and the fungus travels to all parts of the body through the bloodstream.

    As mentioned above, Normally, the large intestine hosts a balance of beneficial bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus bifidus) along with yeast. The harmful Candida is usually kept in check by the Lactobacillus bacteria, partially by the production of lactic acid. Candida actually provides growth factors for Lactobacillus. They exist in a natural balance, until something happens to upset that balance.

    Although there is no "single factor" responsible for turning this naturally occurring organism into an agent of disease, the candidal species is notorious for being an "opportunistic" pathogen: "They incite disease in hosts whose local or systemic immune attributes have been impaired, damaged, or innately dysfunctional". Candida has a tenacious ability to adhere to mucosal surfaces. This is a necessary step for the initiation of candidiasis, and adherence depends on the immune status of the host. Candida secretes enzymes which destroy membrane integrity, leading to dysfunction. Candida also secretes toxins which activate the immune system, overload the liver, and deposit in body tissues.

    The main cause of yeast infections, such as Candida Albicans, is from grain-based foods and drugs, chemicals and poisons. Cooked foods anything in a can or a bag, vaccines which compromise and destroy the natural immune system, antibiotics which kill the friendly bacteria which would ordinarily fight and overwhelm the yeast, steroids that shut down the body's ability to fight back, and any and all other drugs, chemicals and poisons, including frontline, advantage, program, heartguard, etc, that compromise the immune system are all additional reasons for seeing such a preponderance of yeast infections. Yeast infections seem to be one the most under-diagnosed illnesses in the veterinary field.

    Many different types of traditional treatments are being used to treat yeast and other skin problems. Although drugs are temporally effective for the symptoms, they do not eliminate the cause of the symptom. I believe you need to get at the cause, you need to look at the whole picture, the whole dog if you will. Once the cause is found, a PREVENTION PLAN can be initiated.

    Prevention is the cure!

    Immediately you need to get your dog on raw meat and bone diet with supplements to balance and boost the immune system, cleanse these toxins from the body, re-establish the good/friendly bacteria to help the body to crowd-out and combat the yeast and enhance the level of nutrition. As prevention, these must be permanent lifestyle changes for your dog in order for him/her to be able to resist any future yeast infections.

    While a fresh, raw meat and bones diet is the preferable diet, if you are not willing to go to an all raw diet for your dog then please consider a grain and potato free or at the very least,switch to a home cooked diet with out grains or vegetables (at least until the yeast is under control).


    *Just be warned that it will take longer to get the yeast under control with a processed food diet.


    Let's just think about this for a minute, you see, science proves dogs are CARNIVORES and were not designed to eat grains in the first place. They do not manufacter amylase in their saliva, to start the break-down of carbohydrates and starches; amylase in the saliva is something omnivorous and herbivorous animals possess, but not carnivorous animals. This places the burden entirely on the pancreas, forcing it to produce large amounts of amylase to deal with the starch, cellulose, and carbohydrates in grains and plant matter. (The carnivore's pancreas does not secrete cellulase to split the cellulose into glucose molecules), nor have dogs become efficient at digesting and assimilating and utilizing gains or plant material as a source of high quality protein. Herbivores do those sorts of things.
    Read Canine and Feline Nutrition Case, Carey and Hirakawa Published by Mosby, 1995

    A dog's main diet in the wild is raw prey (meat). In the wild they eat very little vegetation at all and NO grains.

    What CAN my dog eat that as anti-yeast foods?

    Meats:
    Fresh, (organic when possible) chicken, fish, rabbit, turkey, goat, cornish hen, lamb beef, quail, duck.

    Vegetables:
    Since dogs do not produce very much amylase or celulase at all, which would make digesting vegetables possible, it is best to avoid them all together.

    However, if you for your own sake feel the need to feed some kind of vegetation, organic sprouts and leafy greens that have been throughly pulverized or juiced can be fed in very small amounts.

    Fruits:
    It is also best to avoid feeding fruits at all, especially while starving out yeast due to the sugar content. As the dog heals you may begin to add fresh organic blueberries, raspberries and/or blackberries when they are in season.

    Water:
    If you do not drink your own tap water then please, do not give it to your dog to drink. Use purified or distilled water... You don't want to give your dog any illnesses due to WATER CONTAMINATION.

    Cleansing and de-toxing

    Detox or cleanse the Blood.
    Toxins are the impurities that the filtering systems of the body tries to eliminate so that these impurities do not get into the blood stream. Once these contaminants ARE in the blood stream, the body begins to lose nutrition. The blood is either able to feed the body with good wholesome nutrients, or it is feeding the body with contaminates ultimately causing serious health issues.

    Every diagnosed disease has as its root cause--toxins. These toxins are circulating within your dog's body with every single beat of its little heart. If you will clean up your dog's internal body, then maintain its internal cleanliness on a regular basis, your dog can return to health and stay that way.

    Importance of Replenishing the Good/Friendly Bacteria
    The good bacteria that are attached to the inner intestinal walls are benign and do not harm our dogs (or us for that matter). They donít make harmful chemicals or provoke immune responses and inflammation. In fact, these microorganisms actually protect us from the adherence of disease causing bacteria, like Salmonella and Shigella, which cause diarrhea.

    The disruption if the intestinal balance is where the troubles begin. The Candida yeast goes through cycles of overgrowth, where toxins are released throughout the system causing numerous or various symptoms. Candida makes a variety of toxic chemicals, which kill the good bacteria. The making of these chemicals prevents bacteria from coming back and enables the yeast to stay. If antibiotics have been used, they too kill all the good bacteria with the bad and the yeast gets a stronghold. Give your dog probiotics to re-build the good bacteria and to help choke out the yeast.

    Provide vital Ďlive foodí dietary enzymes
    Live enzymes are completely absent from all cooked and processed pet foods. These key enzymes are what provide the necessary mechanisms to help the body produce powerful antioxidant enzymes. In combating yeast infections, they play a vital role by helping to flush out the dying Candida yeast toxins from the body and free radicals at a cellular level.


    Add a good, natural source with herbs and antioxidents which are all designed to build the immune system back up and help keep it balanced.

    Frequent bathing can cause more harm then good for the most part. However, if your dog still smells offensive and a good massage and/or brushing does not help, you can give once weekly baths to clear the skin of dead and dying materials, however, please, only use a natural ingredient product with no chemicals.
    The use of essential oils in the shampoo or final rinse will assist naturally in killing the bacteria on the skin it's self as well as start it healing. Such oils as Lavender, Myrrh, Rosemary, Eucalyptus or Melaleuca alternifoila are good for this purpose.


    You can also use a rinse with a 50/50 mixture of raw, un-filtered apple cider vinegar and water which will also aid in healing and killing the bacteria growing on the skin; HOWEVER, APPLE-CIDER VINEGAR rinses should NEVER be applied to pets with any open lesions.

    Apple Cider Vinegar or Grapefruit Seed Extract may also be added to your dog's drinking water

    It is important to note that this is a slow cleansing process which can often take 3-7 months before you see major changes with your dog.

    The symptoms of cleansing and de-toxing usually occur about 3-4 weeks into the changes. These symptoms of cleansing, include itchiness and inflammation which will often appear to worsen during the initial two months of the program, inflamed and itchy ears, skin eruptions and/or flu-like symptoms like vomiting, loose stools, diarrhea and lethargy. This healing crisis effect of the body detoxifying can last for quite some period at times and requires patience on your part.

    Make sure to keep an eye on your petís general health and temperature and certainly DONíT AVOID treatment by your "Holistic" Veterinarian for serious infections.

    Most dogs show a response to treatment within a month however, from what I have seen, the time needed here averages out to be 1 month for every year of life! Slightly longer for those with a history of medication usage like antibiotics, steroids and antihistamines. The length of treatment seems proportional to the cooperation of the owner. In other words, if the owner gives the remedies once a day, administers antibiotics during the treatment program, and feeds a low quality diet, the treatment will take longer. Treatment will be more effective if the owner remains persistent with the required regimen.

    A yeast infection can be a very frustrating ailment that takes commitment on your part (dog owner/guardian). The program is not easy for many, however, when the yeast is under control, owners report significant improvement and a new positive lifestyle for their dog.

    *A CONSULTATION is highly recommended before any preventative program or treatment is started. A consultation includes a personalized diet and holistic program suggestions that are custom-tailored to your own dog's individual and personal needs. While I will continue to provide and even add educational articles on the website and Blog, most of these are general in nature. I therefore encourage you to tailor a program specifically for your dog's needs. This is particularly imperative in pets with complicated health issues, or if you've done a lot of outside reading and have conflicting information.



    My Golden's slideshow:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3cQhJc2LDM
    My Hovawart's slideshow:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uh_1toD6xtc
    If you don't like a wet,shedding dog,don't get a Golden or an Hovawart!.

  4. #4
    Senior Dog Member+ alimel's Avatar
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    See that! On Golden's post (great information by the way) is suggests going raw to alleviate yeast

    Immediately you need to get your dog on raw meat and bone diet with supplements to balance and boost the immune system, cleanse these toxins from the body, re-establish the good/friendly bacteria to help the body to crowd-out and combat the yeast and enhance the level of nutrition. As prevention, these must be permanent lifestyle changes for your dog in order for him/her to be able to resist any future yeast infections.
    Life is short, play with your dog!

  5. #5
    Senior Dog Member+ alimel's Avatar
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    Look what I found today....

    Neem is a herbal remedy for the medication of fever, gastrointestinal disease, skin disorders, respiratory disease, intestinal parasites, immune system disorder, and yeast infections in pets. [/B]
    Life is short, play with your dog!

  6. #6
    Senior Dog Member+ saluki-sue's Avatar
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    I would lay off anything with wheat in it as most of the time wheat and yeast go hand in hand. If you don't want to do raw that you have to prep yourself, you can do a grain and gluten free diet that will help alot. Check out the foods from "The Honest Kitchen" www.thehonestkitchen.com

    I have one client who is using their Preference food. I use their Sparkle supplement in my boys home cooked food once or twice a week.
    Serenity begins when you stop expecting and start accepting

  7. #7
    Senior Dog Member+ fairlight's Avatar
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    Like Ali said...there's another boost for raw!

    Great information Golden...thank you!
    Love knows not its own depth until the hour of separation.

    Kabil Gibran

  8. #8
    Senior Dog Member+ Obedog's Avatar
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    You guys are GREAT!!! Golden, man, there is a lot to absorb in your post, but I am going to print it, and reread... Too much info at one time... And it sounds like what Mattie has gone thru... ear infections, always a lick sore at some part of her body, and now this toenail that won't heal... The chiro said to put tea tree oil on it, or also vick vaporub... To kill the fungus, but he is the one that said yeast... Her coat gets flaky also, so this is all good to know...

    As far as a manufactured food, I am going to switch to a grain free, gluten free....

    And alimel, where to I find Neem??? Is it a dietary supplement?

    S.S. I will check out the link... I have to get to the bottom of this,

    Fairlight, I know raw is great, but I have to admit I have to stay with manufactured... So have to find which is best in that category... I am just not ready to take that leap yet...

    But I knew I could count on you guys!!! Golden, you are always a WEALTH of information!!!! Thanks
    I'm not bossy, I just have better ideas!

  9. #9
    water dogs rock!! Senior Dog Member+ HovawartMom's Avatar
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    All in all,I would feed the dog, a grain-free kibble cos yeast is found in grain and flour!.
    You have a couple of good food like:Innova Evo,Natural Balance,Canidae grain-free,Wellness that you could look into!.For sore in foot,I use the blue rinse for teeth and then, gold bond and off it desapear!.
    This recipe is use a lot for hot spots!.
    For the ears,I use 1/2 vinagar and 1/2 peroxyl and Priska hasn't had an ear infection or yeast since 5 yrs,even though,she swims,everyday!.
    My Golden's slideshow:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3cQhJc2LDM
    My Hovawart's slideshow:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uh_1toD6xtc
    If you don't like a wet,shedding dog,don't get a Golden or an Hovawart!.

  10. #10
    Senior Dog Member+ saluki-sue's Avatar
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    Obed, neem is the oil of the Neem tree from Inda. You can get it online in many forms, pure oil, mixed with coat sprays. I like to get the pure oil and put it on with out diluting it or mix it with shampoo, sprays. It has a very strong smell so beware. But you won't find anything better for killing fungus, keep bugs away and improving a dogs coat.

    For internal help you can give her oil of oregano. It to can be put on the soar spots and mixed with sprays, but I find it works better from the inside out. But and then they smell like pizza went they come for a kiss.
    Serenity begins when you stop expecting and start accepting

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