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Thread: Doberman Health Questions (split from losing hair)

  1. #11
    Protector of Dobes Senior Dog Member+ Dobified's Avatar
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    Just a couple of questions.


    What are you feeding him? Sounds like it could be an allergy to food or surroundings. Some dogs can be hyper allergic to your carpet, there are some pretty nasty chemicals in carpet.



    Does it sound like this ?:

    COLOR MUTANT ALOPECIA (Color Dilution Alopecia (CDA) - is a hereditary disease most often seen in blue- or fawn-coated Dobermans. Color mutant Dobes are born with a healthy hair coat but, usually beginning in adolescence to early adulthood, the coat becomes thin, brittle, patchy and dry. The skin becomes rough and scaly. Blackheads, papules, and pustules may appear over the body. There is no cure, only treatments to relieve the surface conditions.

    Or this :
    Atopic Dermatitis is characterized by roughened, itchy, oozing skin caused by immune reactions. It is a genetically programmed disease although the exact mode of inheritance is unknown. The onset of clinical signs varies from six months to seven years with 70% first showing symptoms between 1 and 3 years of age.

    Ok this is LONG but do any of these sound correct ?


    Integumentary (Dermatologic or skin) Diseases

    Acne is also called muzzle folliculitis and furunculosis. It is a chronic inflammatory disorder of short-coated breeds including Dobermans. The accompanying bacterial involvement is secondary. Veterinary dermatologists believe these lesions, that occur on the chin and lips, are the result of some undetermined genetic predisposition. The age of onset is variable.

    Color Dilution Alopecia is a genetic disease reportedly occurring in as many as 93% of blue and 75% of fawn Dobermans. It is usually first noticed as recurrent bacterial hair follicle infection and loss of hair on the back. Dogs with light blue coats are often affected as early as 6 months of age, whereas dogs with less dilution (e.g. steel blue) may not have signs until 2 or 3 years of age or later. Vigorous grooming can accelerate the process. After initial loss of hair over the back the rest of the body typically is involved, often progressing to baldness. With time, the ability to regrow hair decreases and the exposed skin becomes subject to environmental insults and scaliness is common. The mode of inheritance is unknown but appears to be more complex than the simple autosomal recessive gene responsible for dilution.

    Canine Follicular Dysplasia refers to a group of diseases caused by coat changes in which color dilution alopecia is included.

    Seasonal Flank Alopecia is another of the group of follicular dysplasias. Some dogs lose hair in the late fall and regrow it spontaneously in the spring; others do the reverse and lose hair in the spring. These dogs develop a nonscarring hair loss confined to the flank areas. Lesions are symmetrical on both sides of the flank. It is unclear as to whether or not this condition is related to flank sucking. Seasonal flank alopecia occurs in several breeds; flank sucking is especially prevalent in Dobermans, leading to speculation of genetic influence.

    Bullous Pemphigoid is a rare disease of dogs in general but Dobermans appear to be predisposed to its development. It is a disease involving blisters and ulcers that may affect the mouth, the skin , and the junction between mucous membranes and skin. Skin lesions often occur in the axillary space (armpit) and groin. Mucous membrane skin lesions are often present around the mouth, anus, and penile sheath. Mode of inheritance is unknown and age of onset is variable.

    Canine Benign Familial Pemphigus is an autosomal dominant disorder resulting from an inability of certain cells of the skin to stick together. Because of the defect, the skin cannot withstand trauma and blisters develop in response to friction or infection. Age of onset is less than 7 months of age.

    Ichthyosis (fish scale disease) is a rare congenital skin disease present at birth, characterized by extreme thickening on all or part of the skin, and by exaggerated thickening of the foot pads. Mode of inheritance is unknown.

    Lichenoid Dermatosis is a rare condition involving asymptomatic symmetric groups of angular, flat-topped, elevated lesions that are scaly to markedly thickened. They may occur anywhere on the body in animals that are otherwise healthy. Age of onset is usually less than 6 months and mode of inheritance is unknown.

    Pemphigus Foliaceus usually occurs at or before 4 years of age. Clinical signs usually start on the face or ears, and involve foot pads. There may be reddened spots that progress to crusty brown areas. The skin is scaly and hair loss is present. Mode of inheritance is unknown.

    Pemphigus Vulgaris generally occurs at or under 2 years of age. The groin, axillae (armpits) and junction between skin and mucous membranes demonstrate erosive to ulcerative areas. Inheritance mechanisms are unknown.

    Primary Seborrhea is characterized by excessive production of sebum, causing flaking skin that is greasy and smells bad. There may be multiple crusty, scaly areas that itch, often present at or before 1 year of age. The inheritance mechanism is unknown. It is not to be confused with seborrhea that is secondary to other conditions.

    Sebaceous Adenitis usually occurs at or prior to 1 year of age. Mode of inheritance is unknown. Symptoms tend to be symmetrical on both sides of the body and can appear anywhere. Hairs are dull, brittle and tend to be matted. There is severe scaliness. The skin tends to be greasy and there can be severe hair loss in affected areas. Hereditary mechanism is unknown in the Doberman.

    Subcorneal Pustular Dermatosis: lesions generally on trunk or head with hair loss, crusting and small pockets of pus under the skin. Itching is variable. Age of onset is less than 2 years. Inheritance mode unknown.

    Zinc Responsive Dermatosis occurs at less than 6 weeks of age. Mode of inheritance is undetermined in the Doberman. Rough, cracking and oozing skin is caused by the inability to metabolize zinc. Zinc supplementation can correct this disorder. Calcium over-supplementation (owner induced) can also cause relative zinc deficiency.

    Canine Juvenile Cellulitis (juvenile pyoderma, puppy strangles, juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis). Although not listed as a disease of Dobermans in Control of Genetic Diseases by Dr. Padgett, this condition is not uncommon in this author's practice experience. Heritability (mode unknown) is supported by increased occurrence in certain breeds and by familial histories. Puppies are usually affected between the age of 3 weeks and 4 months. One or several in the litter may be affected. Most owners notice an ACUTELY swollen face, especially the eyelids, lips and muzzle. Usually at this time the veterinarian will find striking enlargement of the lymph nodes of the neck. Within 24 to 48 hours abscesses develop rapidly on the lips, muzzle, chin, bridge of nose, and around the eyes. These lesions typically open, drain, and crust. An external ear infection that drains pus is often present.

    Affected skin is usually painful but does not itch. Early and aggressive veterinary treatment is necessary because permanent scarring can be severe. Dermatologists list diseases with similar symptoms as staph pyoderma, demodectic mange, and drug eruptions. In this author's experience another condition must be considered. Doberman ******* are recognized as not always being particularly good mothers (genetic?). Unattended or poorly supervised litters are susceptible to attacks by the bitch, often without any awareness on the part of the owner, giving rise to wounds that resemble the lesions of juvenile cellulitis. Adding to the diagnostic puzzle is the fact that these attacks often occur at the same time juvenile cellulitis occurs, between 3 weeks and 4 months of age. An accurate diagnosis is essential and a meaningful history is essential to accurate diagnosis.


    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

  2. #12
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    Sebaceous Adenitis usually occurs at or prior to 1 year of age. Mode of inheritance is unknown. Symptoms tend to be symmetrical on both sides of the body and can appear anywhere. Hairs are dull, brittle and tend to be matted. There is severe scaliness. The skin tends to be greasy and there can be severe hair loss in affected areas. Hereditary mechanism is unknown in the Doberman.


    This one sounds more as to what is going on i wonder if there is a cure or a way to get his hair to grow back.thank you so much for taking the time to look that up

  3. #13
    Protector of Dobes Senior Dog Member+ Dobified's Avatar
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    Talk to your vet.


    Glad I could help !
    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

  4. #14
    Banned sheplovr's Avatar
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    Hot Spots?

    Honey Most Hot Spots are due to fleas, ticks, allergeries to food, grass, chemicals in and out of the home used.
    Give him a soothing bath in Oatmeal shampoo and conditioner, dry with blow dryer some but not totally towel rub him.
    Put some oil for your hair in the palm of your hand rub them together and rub on the dog like u do for your hair for shine and dry ends.
    Get the dog on a good dog dry kibbble such as Flint River Ranch, Chicken Soup, Ca Natural, Innova, Strive, Bil Jac frozen raw. Dog food if u read on my site: WWW.VOMSCHREKNHAUS.COM I have my final of five segments on vets opinions of WHAT DOES YOUR DOG REALLY EAT?? It is totaly gross and disgusting and I have been getting emails from India, Phillaphines of what to feed their dogs reading my site of the JUNK AND GARBAGE put into our pets dog food then charging outrageous prices for making us think we are buying the best. Purina is the UTMOST WORSE COMPANY FOR DUMPING DEAD ANIMALS, ROAD KILLS, FEATHERS, ETC into the food the process. I can post from one to five so u can all read it again if u request this by vets written.
    at www.springtime.com/live u can get Bug Off for fleas n ticks all natural and I give my dogs Joint Guard also. I am planning on also giving Longevity too. highly expensive but are out pets not worth it. Do not put flea vials on them and do not get annual shots, every 3 years is enough of them and 3 year Rabi shot is enough, this cuts down so the dog need not deal with so much as I am about to research on dog shots next to post on my site for they are more deadly than the disease they are to prevent.
    Brush the dog good daily, give him garlic powder till u get Bug Off and treat the lawn every spring with HOT LIME sprinkled with a sprayer for about 24 dollars from Lowes to kill all bugs, larvae waiting to hatch, etc.
    Hit the hot spots with aloe cream or lotions rubbed good into his skin.
    Hope this helps you out?
    Pat

  5. #15
    Protector of Dobes Senior Dog Member+ Dobified's Avatar
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    Sheplovr. Thanks for the info. Your site is great !
    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

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