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Thread: uh does spinach affect thyroid function?

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    uh does spinach affect thyroid function?

    I know broccoli can but does spinach? Can anyone find any evidence to support either it can or does not affect thyroid function in a negative aspect?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BorzoiMom View Post
    I know broccoli can but does spinach? Can anyone find any evidence to support either it can or does not affect thyroid function in a negative aspect?
    this is what came up in a quick search for me:
    There is an effect in humans where a high fiber diet can alert thyroxine concentrations. This has not been investigated very thoroughly in dogs, but thoughts at this time are its effect is not clinically significant.

    I couldn't find anything on spinach specifically, but the question that prompted the above was regarding a dog being fed spinach.... if that helps at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mythbuster View Post
    this is what came up in a quick search for me:
    There is an effect in humans where a high fiber diet can alert thyroxine concentrations. This has not been investigated very thoroughly in dogs, but thoughts at this time are its effect is not clinically significant.

    I couldn't find anything on spinach specifically, but the question that prompted the above was regarding a dog being fed spinach.... if that helps at all.
    Thank you Mythbusters!
    If combined with apples, ie higher on vitamin c, shouldn't this help to off set an adverse affects also?

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    Fruit Platter mama! Senior Dog Member+ Savage Destiny's Avatar
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    Spinach isn't a cruciferous vegetable like broccoli, so I don't believe it is an issue. The cruciferous family contains broccoli, cauliflower, kale, bok choy, and probably other things I can't remember right now.
    Do what is best for your animal, not what is best for yourself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Savage Destiny View Post
    Spinach isn't a cruciferous vegetable like broccoli, so I don't believe it is an issue. The cruciferous family contains broccoli, cauliflower, kale, bok choy, and probably other things I can't remember right now.
    Excellent! Thank you. Its been quite awhile since I had spinach involved in the dogs diet. I remember that I did not give Femka ( thyroid compromised) kale, broccoli or cauliflower. So this fits in with that memory.

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    Pom Mom Senior Dog Member+ Deb's Tiny Dogs's Avatar
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    Just as an aside, spinach is extremely high in oxalates. So, if you're home making and have a dog prone to calcium oxalates crystals or stones, leave out the spinach.

    Cali has low thyroid and brocolli has not been mentioned as one to avoid as the others mentioned by above.
    Forever my boys, Bogey and Miko. All my love till we meet again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deb's Tiny Dogs View Post
    Just as an aside, spinach is extremely high in oxalates. So, if you're home making and have a dog prone to calcium oxalates crystals or stones, leave out the spinach.

    Cali has low thyroid and brocolli has not been mentioned as one to avoid as the others mentioned by above.
    I could not give broccoli to Femka or her thyroid would crash in levels. ( ie high A4 very low T4.
    I do not have a breed that is prone to calcium stones. I know some breeds are like aussies or schnauzers but not Borzoi nor a greyhound.

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    Pom Mom Senior Dog Member+ Deb's Tiny Dogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BorzoiMom View Post
    I could not give broccoli to Femka or her thyroid would crash in levels. ( ie high A4 very low T4.
    I do not have a breed that is prone to calcium stones. I know some breeds are like aussies or schnauzers but not Borzoi nor a greyhound.
    Sorry, I said that wrong! Broccoli was mentioned to avoid.
    Forever my boys, Bogey and Miko. All my love till we meet again.

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    Thats okay Deb It is hard sometimes to keep it all straight and even why I had to ask about spinach.

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    Senior Dog Member happysquee's Avatar
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    Even if you were to feed broccoli: "It is true that cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, broccoli and cauliflower contain natural chemicals called goitrogens (goiter producers) that can interfere with thyroid hormone synthesis. Other foods that contain these chemicals include corn, sweet potatoes,lima beans, turnips, peanuts, cassava (YUCA), canola oil and soybeans. Fortunately, the goitrogens in these foods are inactivated by cooking, even by light steaming, so there is no need to forego the valuable antioxidant and cancer- protective effects cruciferous vegetables afford."

    http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/QAA355093

    "However, if you habitually eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables raw, you should let your physician know. A simple blood test can reveal whether or not the dose of the thyroid hormone replacement drug you are taking is adequate. You should have a blood test once a year in any event. Your dose may need to be adjusted if you gain or lose weight, if you are pregnant, and, sometimes, if you start or stop birth control pills. Some medications, including antacids containing aluminum, can also interfere with thyroid hormone absorption and require an adjustment in dosage.
    You should further be aware that excess consumption of soy can be a problem when you're taking thyroid replacement medication. Be sure to tell your physician how much soy you're eating so your dosage can be adjusted, if necessary. Eating soy foods at the same time that you take thyroid hormone can interfere with its absorption so, to be safe, don't eat soy within three hours of taking your medication. You are unlikely to run into a problem with moderate soy consumption - one serving a day of whole soy products, such as one cup of soy milk or one half cup of tofu, soy protein (tempeh), or crispy soy nuts."

    I imagine a lot of this could be the same for dogs.
    Treat everyone with politeness, even those who are rude to you - not because they are nice, but because you are. ~Author Unkown

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